‘Academic achievement is not the only measure for value,’ says FTA’s Sally Gilson

The government’s migration advisory committee (MAC) has proposed a ban on foreign workers earning less than £30,000 a year from obtaining visas to work in the UK post Brexit, in a move which has been bashed by a number of UK sectors which have high levels of migrant employment.

The MAC report recommends changing the system by which workers are assessed on their eligibility for working status in the UK. Sally Gilson, the Freight Transport Association’s Head of Skills, says, “This actively discriminates against the lower-skilled workers that the country’s employers so desperately need.

“The MAC report totally fails to recognise, and actively diminishes, the role of lower-skilled migrants within the UK’s economy, which is hugely disappointing from a logistics point of view,”

The FTA claim that the proposal would actively discriminate against the lower-skilled workers that the sectors UK-based employers so desperately need.

Richard Burnett, the chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, which represents 7,000 hauliers, said: “We need an immigration policy across all skill levels. It is about what our businesses need. The idea that only high-skilled immigration should be allowed is both ignorant and elitist.”

It’s not only the logistics supply chain which is affected, with representatives from trade associations such as the Federation of Master Builders and from Hospitality groups also speaking out against the proposed tier system.
According to the latest quarterly report from the Office of National Statistics, for the year ending March 2018, work continued to be the main reason that people migrated long-term to the UK, with 253,000 people arriving for work which made up 41% of all immigration in this period.

Richard Burnett, the chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, which represents 7,000 hauliers, said: “We need an immigration policy across all skill levels. It is about what our businesses need. The idea that only high-skilled immigration should be allowed is both ignorant and elitist.”

The disruption of Brexit may mean economic uncertainty within a number of sectors, and so it’s not surprising that this proposal will have come as a blow. A study conducted by Oxford Economics to inform the report found that £2,300 more to public finances in 2016/17. The Labour Party have said that it did not accept the distinction between high and low skilled put forward in the report, arguing that any future migration policy should be based on the needs of each industrial sector.

‘Academic achievement is not the only measure for value,’ says FTA’s Sally Gilson

The government’s migration advisory committee (MAC) has proposed a ban on foreign workers earning less than £30,000 a year from obtaining visas to work in the UK post Brexit, in a move which has been bashed by a number of UK sectors which have high levels of migrant employment.

The MAC report recommends changing the system by which workers are assessed on their eligibility for working status in the UK. Sally Gilson, the Freight Transport Association’s Head of Skills, says, “This actively discriminates against the lower-skilled workers that the country’s employers so desperately need.

“The MAC report totally fails to recognise, and actively diminishes, the role of lower-skilled migrants within the UK’s economy, which is hugely disappointing from a logistics point of view,”

The FTA claim that the proposal would actively discriminate against the lower-skilled workers that the sectors UK-based employers so desperately need.

Richard Burnett, the chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, which represents 7,000 hauliers, said: “We need an immigration policy across all skill levels. It is about what our businesses need. The idea that only high-skilled immigration should be allowed is both ignorant and elitist.”

It’s not only the logistics supply chain which is affected, with representatives from trade associations such as the Federation of Master Builders and from Hospitality groups also speaking out against the proposed tier system.
According to the latest quarterly report from the Office of National Statistics, for the year ending March 2018, work continued to be the main reason that people migrated long-term to the UK, with 253,000 people arriving for work which made up 41% of all immigration in this period.

Richard Burnett, the chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, which represents 7,000 hauliers, said: “We need an immigration policy across all skill levels. It is about what our businesses need. The idea that only high-skilled immigration should be allowed is both ignorant and elitist.”

The disruption of Brexit may mean economic uncertainty within a number of sectors, and so it’s not surprising that this proposal will have come as a blow. A study conducted by Oxford Economics to inform the report found that £2,300 more to public finances in 2016/17. The Labour Party have said that it did not accept the distinction between high and low skilled put forward in the report, arguing that any future migration policy should be based on the needs of each industrial sector.